‘The Woman Who Walked Into Doors’ by Roddy Doyle

Be honest, what would you do? 1001004001086549

Imagine that you were mistreated by the man of whom you loved. What would you do? Cry, scream, run away or stay? Paula Spencer, married to Charlo Spencer, got to do with everything of this each day. Broken nose, bruised ribs, loose teeth, blue eyes, I say: welcome to Paula’s life. He punched, kicked, shoved and raped her. Roddy Doyle, author of The Woman Who Walked Into Doors, became known for The Commitment, the first part of the Barrytown trilogy published in 1987. After which The Snapper (1990) and The Van (1991) followed. All the three comedies are about the glue that holds families together .

Everything made you one thing or the other. It tired you out sometimes. I remember spending ages exhausted and upset. It was nice knowing that boys wanted you but you couldn’t  want them back.

The Woman Who Walked Into Doors, Roddy Doyle.

It’s really amazing what Paula experiences, her husband murdered a woman and abused her regularly. Despite her problems with Charlo, she cared a lot about her children. It was remarkable that she was addicted to alcohol, but kept it bent for her children. Every time her husband hit her,  she hoped someone would notice this and would save her. The only reason she stayed with him were her children. She is a very caring mother and that comes forward every time. Paula came from a large family with financial trouble. She still has disagreements with her ​​older sister Carmel about their childhood and her husband Charlo. Paula still believed in Charlo and loved him. However, her opinion changed when Charlo began to hate their eldest daughter, Nicola. This was the time for Paula to do something, she threw him out of the house. Charlo is history.

You don’t expect to have to pay for your husband’s funeral; it’s not one of te things you plan for when he’s forty, especially when he hasn’t lived with you for over a year.

The Woman Who Walked Into Doors, Roddy Doyle.

Doyle was born in Dublin in 1958, he studied English and Geography at the Greendale Community School in Kilbarrack, where he still lives. He wrote mainly about the middle class and that is evident in his writing style. He also wrote children’s books such as The Giggler Treatment (2000) and Rover Saves Christmas (2001). Roddy Doyle also wrote  a chapter for Manslaughter in Dublin (2002) A comic thriller written by a total of 15 Irish authors. Every writer took a chapter in itself. This book was written for Amnesty International.

Did you fall down the stairs, Paula? Did you walk into a door, Paula? What made him do that, Paula? What made you do that, Paula? Did you say something to him, Paula?

The Woman Who Walked Into Doors, Roddy Doyle.

Roddy Doyle writes very simple and especially with short sentences. His writing style fits very well with the simple protagonist of the book. Paula Spencer is as we know not developed and educated at all. The story is sometimes confusing because it is not told in chronological order. This gives the reader the ability to form all the little pieces into one unit. We see everything through Paula’s eyes so we only know her thoughts and feelings. The downside is that you do not know what the other characters think, this could be useful in some situations.

I was so depressed I didn’t even know there was a door there. I didn’t know where I really was, or sometimes who I was. It was all nothing. Days disappeared. 

The Woman Who Walked Into Doors, Roddy Doyle.

Doyle has a very subtle writing style, I think he did this well because he does not use complex structures and the story is described very short and powerful. So, The Woman Who Walked Into Doors is a combination of an exciting story, perfectly written and very unpredictable.

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 Why are you still waiting? Read The Woman Who Walked Into Doors by Roddy Doyle.

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